Adachi S Personal Statement

Chihaya Adachi
BornOctober 26, 1963
ResidenceFukuoka, Japan
NationalityJapanese
Known forOrganic electronics, OLED, TADF, Hyperfluoresence
Spouse(s)Mika Inoue
ChildrenYuuki, Akira
Websitehttp://www.cstf.kyushu-u.ac.jp/~adachilab/lab/?lang=en
Scientific career
InstitutionsCenter for Organic Photonics and Electronics Research (OPERA) at Kyushu University

Chihaya Adachi (born 26 October 1963) is a Japan-born scientist and lecturer specializing in organic electronics which is a field of materials science. Adachi is the Director of the Center for Organic Photonics and Electronics Research (OPERA) at Kyushu University,[1] a large multi-disciplinary team of physicists, chemists, and engineers from both academia and industry.

Adachi is recognized as an innovator in the development of materials for organic light-emitting diodes (OLED).[2] He has pioneered a new technology known as thermally activated delayed fluorescence (TADF).[3]

In 2015, Adachi co-founded Kyulux in Fukuoka, Japan, to commercialize hyper-fluorescence TADF emitters, and he is a scientific advisor and ex-officio board member of Kyulux.[4] Adachi also serves on Elsevier’s Organic Electronics Editorial Board.[5]

Early career[edit]

Adachi held positions at Ricoh Co., Shinshu University, Princeton University, and at Chitose Institute of Science and Technology. He became a distinguished professor at Kyushu University in 2010,[6] and his current posts also include director of Kyushu University’s Center for Organic Photonics and Electronics Research (OPERA) since 2010.

Education[edit]

Adachi obtained the degree of Bachelor of Science from Chuo University in 1986. He went on to earn his Master of Science degree in Kyushu University in 1988. Adachi obtained his doctorate in Materials Science and Technology in 1991 from Kyushu University.

Research, patents and awards[edit]

Adachi has had over 445 papers published in the field of organic electronics.[7] Adachi's lab in Kyushu University has filed over 180 patents since 1989.[8] Prof. Adachi's work and achievements[9] are regarded as fundamental to scientific understanding of OLED device mechanisms, structures and developments. Specific areas in which the Adachi's work was instrumental include highly efficiency phosphorescence emission, OLED host materials and OLED degradation.

In 2012 Prof. Adachi discovered a new class of light emitting materials that utilize thermally activated delayed fluorescence, or TADF.[10] Since then his research activities are mainly focused on TADF and Hyperfluorescence OLED emission.

In 2014 the Society for Information Display(SID) awarded Prof. Adachi with its 2014 SID Fellow Award that honors individuals who have made a widely recognized and significant contribution to the field of information display.[11]

In 2007 Prof. Adachi's paper "Relaxation of Roll-off Characteristics in Organic Electrophosphorescence diodes" won the Outstanding Poster Paper Award at the 7th International Meeting on Information Display (IMID2007).[12] In July 2016 Prof. Adachi was one of the scientists recognized at the Japan Research Front Awards 2016.[13] The Award, which is in its fourth year, was organized by the Intellectual Property & Science (IP & Science) business of Thomson Reuters. Other awards include the 2003 Funai Foundation for Information Technology FFIT Award, the 2004 dstinguished paper award on Organic electroluminescence (by the Japan Society of Applied Physics) and the 2004 Nano-Tech Award (IT&Electronics division).[14]

In the 2007 Prof. Adachi received the Commendation for Science and Technology by the Japanese Minister of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology. In 2016 Prof Adachi was awarded with the Japan Society of Applied Physics Fellow Award.

Personal[edit]

Married Mika Inoue, July 7, 1988. Children: Yuuki, Akira.

References[edit]

  1. ^Center for Organic Photonics and Electronics Research (OPERA) at Kyushu University.
  2. ^”Breakthrough in OLED Technology”, American Institute of Physics (March 2, 2015).
  3. ^Diaz, Fernando et al. “Photophysics of thermally activated delayed fluorescence molecules”, Methods and Applications In Fluorescence (2017).
  4. ^“Kyulux: Materializing the Future of OLEDs”
  5. ^Organic Electronics Editorial Board. 
  6. ^"Chihaya Adachi". www.journals.elsevier.com. Retrieved 2017-06-25. 
  7. ^"Paper list | Chihaya Adachi lab". www.cstf.kyushu-u.ac.jp. Retrieved 2017-06-26. 
  8. ^"Patents | Chihaya Adachi lab". www.cstf.kyushu-u.ac.jp (in Japanese). Retrieved 2017-06-26. 
  9. ^"Chihaya Adachi - Google Scholar Citations". scholar.google.com. Retrieved 2017-06-29. 
  10. ^Uoyama, Hiroki; Goushi, Kenichi; Shizu, Katsuyuki; Nomura, Hiroko; Adachi, Chihaya (2012-12-13). "Highly efficient organic light-emitting diodes from delayed fluorescence". Nature. 492 (7428): 234–238. doi:10.1038/nature11687. ISSN 0028-0836. 
  11. ^(SID), Society for Information Display. "SID Salutes The 2014 Honors And Awards Recipients For Outstanding Achievements & Contributions To The Display Industry". www.prnewswire.com. Retrieved 2017-07-26. 
  12. ^"Chihaya ADACHI | Kyushu University Global COE Program Science for Future Molecular Systems". www.chem.kyushu-u.ac.jp. Retrieved 2017-07-26. 
  13. ^Analytics, Clarivate. "日本がリードする先端研究領域と、その領域で活躍する研究者を発表 - クラリベイト・アナリティクス". ip-science.thomsonreuters.jp (in Japanese). Retrieved 2017-07-26. 
  14. ^"Adachi's CV (for a Sun Yat-Sen University lecture)"(PDF). 

We have compiled a page full of personal statements by former math majors about the activities they have pursued after graduation. The statements make for an interesting read, and we hope they are helpful in deciding on possible career paths! Many have indicated they would be pleased to hear from current students who have questions or are looking for advice. Statements can be found by last name or graduation year. If you are an alum, we encourage you to submit your statement!

Alumni Statements by Last Name:

A
Yoko Adachi '97
Jyotsna Advani '96
Jocelyn Arcari '99
Nuzhat Binte Arif '13

B
Bridget Baird '69
Jennifer J. Blechar '96
Roberta Paula Books '64
Rebecca Buchanan '95
Kendra Burbank '00
Tiffany Burroughs '02

C
Wandy Chang '01
Linda Cherkassky '93
Hilary Cooke '98
Deborah Cousins '94
A. Heather Coyne '94
Dr. Annalisa Crannell '87
Sarah A Crown '02

D
Amy Dickinson '68
Cecilia Diniz '99
Kathleen Dooley '97
Lisa Duffy '01

E
Rebecca Earle '86

F
Jennifer Faerber '00
Kristine Falk Snyder'02
Elizabeth Ferry '97
Jamie Fiore '98
Jennifer Fisher '00
Heather Fleming '98
Karyn Folland '96
Reena Freedman '93

G
Meagan Neal Gardner '13
Laura Gellert '93
Ivy Gluck '14  
Anna Gordon '07  

H
Emma Haddad '02
Susan Hayflick '80
Zhenjian He '98
Rhonda Hellman '89
Winnie Hien '12
Josephine Gia Hinman '86
Sarah Hockley '11
Jessica Hope '97
Maria Hristova '02
Anna Hu '01

I

J
Susan Jo '00
Ragini Joshi '73

K
Abigail Kay '92
Katie Kerr '92
Sarah Khasawinah '09
Elaina Khenina '00
Theresa Kim '01
Cheryl Koester '99
Keli Kringel '93

L
Benna Lehrer '97
Wendy Leisenring, Sc.D. '86
Jodi Lurie '08

M
Elizabeth H. Margosches '70
Barbara Anne STANFORD Mason '61
Moira McDermott '88
Corinne McNeely '98
Verena Meiser '83
Mary Miller '14
Adèle​ Mirbey '11
Jeanne Mirbey '14
Aili Monahan '02
Linday Moore '00
Vidya Murthy '97

N
Michiru Nasu '00
Jennifer Nissly '02
Jasmine Nittiksimmons '02
Laura McKinney Novak '95

O
Sookyung Oh '14
Janet O'Sullivan '76

P
Cathi Pappas '86
Janita Patwardhan '14
Lori Perine '80
Elisabeth(Lisa) Mennella Pyle '94

Q
Carol (Bergstresser) Quick '90

R
Jessica Ree '99
Kimberly Rhodes '00

S
Billie (Wilma) Sandler '66
Jennifer Savage '12
Catherine Searle'84
Rebecca Segal '94
Dorothy Shu '13
Daniel Soltis '98
Ann K. Stehney Ph.D. '67
Marianne Sutton MD, MPH '79

T
Yuka Tamura '00
Siran Tang '16
Rachael Thomas '01
Robbee Tonubbee '93
Louisa (Winer) Tran '96

U
Meridith Unger '01

V
Rachel E. Vincent '97

W
Sylvia M. Wiegand '66
Kate Wilson '79
Sharon Winer '90
Jill Wong '98
Tong Wu '12

X

Y

Z
Maria Markakis Zestos, MD '83

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Class of 2016

Georgia Griggs
After graduating Bryn Mawr I've gone to UPenn to complete my master of science in engineering in nanotechnology as part of the 4+1 program. As a nanotechnology student, I use math everyday. Since it's an interdisciplinary field, sometimes I'll encounter types of problems I've never seen before. A strong math foundation from Bryn Mawr enables me to confidently approach these problems and solve them! View Georgia's Spotlight.

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Siran Tang
I am now attending the M.S. in Management program at the University of Notre Dame. All of my classmates graduated from colleges with non-business majors, and we will spend one year here to take some business courses. Math plays a crucial role in both my current academic study and my career seeking. View Siran's Spotlight.

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Class of 2014

Ivy Gluck
Since graduating Bryn Mawr, I have been working at Brandywine Global, a Philadelphia-based asset management firm. I work on a large-cap value investment fund as an equity analyst. My team has a value investment philosophy with a contrarian approach that emphasizes behavioral finance. I have also taken and passed the first of three levels of the CFA examination, a professional accreditation offered internationally to investment and finance professionals. I will soon begin studying for level 2! View Ivy's Spotlight.

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Mary Miller
After graduating from Bryn Mawr, I continued working as an intern at the UPenn School of Nursing Biostatistics Consulting Unit while also completing a Master of Science degree in Biostatistics from the Dornsife School of Public Health-Drexel University. Near the end of my program, I accepted a position with Eli Lilly and Company as a Senior Statistician and later relocated to Indianapolis, Indiana, to begin my career in the pharmaceutical industry. I began working at Lilly in August of 2016 and currently provide statistical support to clinical trials in the Oncology Business Unit. View Mary's Spotlight.

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Jeanne Mirbey
After graduating from Bryn Mawr College I worked in a podiatric medical office as a medical assistant for one year while I was studying for the MCATs and working on my applications for podiatric medical school. I now am a second-year podiatric medical student at the College of Podiatric Medicine and Surgery at Des Moines University in the hopes of becoming a foot and ankle surgeon. View Jeanne's Spotlight.

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Sookyung Oh
I work as a Risk Analyst at Citi. I recently rolled off from the 2-year undergraduate program. Basic statistical formula and logic are applied in every model we use (linear regression, R-square, etc.). An analyst needs to have some sort of statistical background to understand what the models are doing. Quantitative skill is also very important since the job involves a lot of (big) numbers. A risk analyst should be tactical and logical in manipulating the number-based data to understand meaning behind them and read the trend. View Sookyung's Spotlight.

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Janita Patwardhan
Since graduating from Bryn Mawr College, I have been pursuing a doctoral degree in applied mathematics at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County. The analysis skills I developed through the math program at Bryn Mawr have greatly assisted me in developing a strong dynamical systems background, which I will use for my dissertation regarding the modeling of pancreatic beta cells. View Janita's Spotlight.

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Class of 2013

Nuzhat Binte Arif
I am a product designer at Grameen Intel Social Business Limited (GISB). As the sole designer at the company, I’m responsible for overseeing all design work here, including digital and print. But over the past year, I have been concentrating more on user experience and user interface design (UX/UI). I am also in my last semester of my master's in computer applications at BRAC University, here in Bangladesh. View Nuzhat's Spotlight.

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Meagan Neal Gardner
I worked for a year as a software engineer for Vanguard and now I stay at home with my two girls (ages 2 and 3 months). I currently tutor pre-algebra part-time. The analytical and problem-solving skills I gained while studying mathematics at Bryn Mawr helped me immensely while working as an software engineer at Vanguard. These skills continue to serve me while tutoring others and navigating important life decisions. View Meagan's Spotlight.

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Dorothy Shu
After graduating from Bryn Mawr, I attended the Graduate School of Education at the University of Pennsylvania to earn my teaching credentials through the Teacher Education Program (TEP). Afterwards, I moved to Connecticut and taught 11th grade mathematics in Hartford for one year. I decided to relocate closer to my family; thus, I am currently teaching at a public charter school in Trenton, N.J. Since leaving Hartford, I have taught seventh and eighth grade mathematics and I am currently teaching fourth grade. View Dorothy's Spotlight.

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Class of 2012

Winnie Hien
Since graduating in 2012 I've held a variety of positions mainly within education. I spent the first two years teaching engineering mathematics and Spanish in Singapore at Ngee Ann Polytechnic as a Princeton-in-Asia fellow. Afterwards, I managed the operations of a Chinese restaurant for a year before becoming a temporary office manager at a turnaround charter school in Boston. I returned to the world of academics in May as a remote test prep expert at Magoosh, where I help students to study for the GRE and the GMAT. Magoosh is an amazing ed-tech startup that provides fun, affordable and accessible test prep to students of more than 185 nations through its online platform. View Winnie's Spotlight.

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Jennifer Savage
I can't believe it has already been almost five years since I graduated from Bryn Mawr! Graduation still feels like yesterday even after all this time. So much has happened in the past five years that it is hard to put into words. Since my time at Bryn Mawr, I have grown as both a person and a mathematician. I am currently in my fifth year of teaching middle school math in the St. Louis area. View Jennifer's Spotlight.

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Tong Wu
Since graduating from Bryn Mawr, I attended Princeton University’s Master in Finance program for two years and then started working at J.P. Morgan Asset Management as a quantitative researcher. View Tong's Spotlight.

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Class of 2011

Sarah Hockley
Hello! My name is Sarah (or SHockley, as I was called at the Mawr) and I graduated in 2011. After that, I got my M.S. in biology and am now in my last year of medical school at Marian University College of Osteopathic Medicine and am hoping to go into emergency medicine. View Sarah's Spotlight.

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Adèle​ Mirbey
After graduating, I took a year off where I was working as a Research Administrator at the Hospital for Special Surgery in New York. In August 2012, I attended dental school at Nova Southeastern University in Florida for four years, and I am now working as a dentist in Orlando, Fla.  The BMC Math Department gave me that sense of organization and devotion to work, which was extremely useful when I attended dental school.  View Adèle​'s Spotlight.

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Class of 2010

Alyssa Martin Johnson
After Bryn Mawr I entered a 2.5-year management training program at Munich Re in Princeton, N.J. During this time, the class of analysts rotated through the company spending 80 percent of time in practical project rotations and 20 percent of the time in classroom training. The program also featured two international training summits at our global headquarters in Munich, Germany. Following the program, I entered an actuarial pricing role in our primary insurance unit, where I spent two years. About a year and eight months ago, I moved into the more strategic position where I am now. My title now is marketing intelligence analyst, which is about half market research and analysis and half then translating the findings into actionable strategy for our business unit. View Alyssa's Spotlight.

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Class of 2009

Sarah Khasawinah
After Bryn Mawr, I went to Johns Hopkins, where I completed an MHS in Biostatistics and PhD in Mental Health. I am a Health and Aging Policy Fellow. I work in the Senate to improve the health and wellbeing of older Americans. Math connects with my position in myriad ways. From basic math literacy to advanced mathematical understanding, I use mathematics and statistics regularly when analyzing data, writing reports, and making recommendations. View Sarah's Spotlight.

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Jaclyn Lang
The year after I graduated from Bryn Mawr in 2009, I completed Part III of the Mathematical Tripos at the University of Cambridge on a Churchill Scholarship. This earned me a Certificate of Advanced Studies in Pure Mathematics. Then I went to UCLA to earn my Ph.D. in mathematics, specifically algebraic number theory, with Professor Haruzo Hida. I finished my Ph.D. in 2016 and am now an NSF postdoc and Fulbright grantee at Université Paris 13 working with Professor Jacques Tilouine. Next year I will be a researcher at the Max Planck Institute for Mathematics in Bonn, Germany. View Jaclyn's Spotlight.

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Class of 2008

Jody Lurie
I've worked in consumer and retail investment banking followed by fixed income research, with a focus on corporate bonds and preferred securities, at Janney Montgomery Scott in the Philadelphia headquarters. Both positions (current and past) have required an innate ability to understand how financial metrics connect and affect one another. Being able to understand the charts, graphs, and tables presented at macro and micro levels is a must. Probability and statistics play important roles in various aspects of financial modeling. View Jody's Spotlight.

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Class of 2007

Anna Gordon
After graduating from the A.B./M.A. program, I went on to GWU for a Ph.D. in Statistics. After finishing the Ph.D. in 2012, I moved to San Francisco to pursue a career as a data scientist in the tech industry. I am now a senior manager of sales strategy at Salesforce, which entails leading statistical analysis and forecasting projects, and disseminating the insights throughout the business. View Anna's Spotlight.

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Class of 2002

Tiffany Burroughs

Email: tiffburroughs@hotmail.com

After graduating from Bryn Mawr in 2002, I applied for several business jobs. Employers were definitely impressed with my mathematical background from Bryn Mawr, (I was offered a couple good jobs), but I really just wasn't excited about working in business at the time. I moved to Minneapolis where I worked as a clinical lab scientist for Memorial Blood Center. I used DNA testing to check donors' blood for HIV, HBV, HCV, and West Nile Virus. I really loved my job! Though I didn't use mathematics on a daily basis, I definitely used skills gained from my mathematical background, like attention to detail and analytical thinking. Now I have moved back to the Philadelphia area where I'm about to begin the master's of mathematics program at Villanova. I'll leave room for flexibility in my future plans, but I'm kind of shifting gears and thinking of working towards a career as an operations research analyst. I miss doing mathematics and it seems like a job that would be a great fit with my interests. Feel free to email me!

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Sarah A Crown


I am currently in the Mathematics PhD program at the University of Michigan. Though it is still early and my mind may change, I am thinking of specializing in algebraic combinatorics. So far I've loved studying here; everyone in the department is both excited about mathematics and also very supportive.

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Kristine Falk Snyder


Since graduating from BMC, I've received a Master's in Integrative Physiology and a Master's and Ph.D. in Applied Mathematics from the University of Colorado, married my husband, and received an NSF postdoctoral fellowship in what is essentially computational neuromechanics. 

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Emma Haddad


These days I'm working at a legal clinic, doing pretty much whatever needs doing. It's very interesting, but I don't really use any math beyond arithmetic. For the future, I want to teach. I'm applying to graduate schools in education to begin either this summer or fall, depending on the program.

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Maria Hristova


I started working as a Software Test Engineer at Microsoft in August of 2002. I work on a product called SharePoint Team Services which is a collaboration software allowing people to share information and manage group activities efficiently. We will be releasing version 2.0 of the product later on this year so things are a little hectic here right now. My job consists of testing various aspects of the product and making sure that we ship a quality piece of software to our customers. I am happy that I decided to go into the industry instead of grad school right away but I have to be honest and say that I think about going back to school quite often.

I double-majored with CS at Bryn Mawr and deciding to stick with the double major was probably the smartest thing that I could have done. I have to admit that I use more the knowledge that I acquired as a CS major in my job but having double-majored with Math gives me that extra piece of credibility whenever I need it. :) I am involved with the Women Organization at Microsoft and I plan to come back to BMC on a diversity recruiting trip at some point this year."

This is the short version - if I were the tell the long one I would probably say that when I came to Microsoft the learning curve almost killed me the first couple of months and I am still recovering from that. Everybody here is very openly competitive and I was shocked to discover that coming out of Bryn Mawr. There aren't enough women in the technology field and this is very apparent at a company like Microsoft -I am hoping to get more involved with the diversity recruiting efforts that we have here and try to change that. But the long version would take too long and I have to run for a meeting. :)

I hope to get a chance to see you and the rest of the Math department when I come back on the recruiting trip. If you know of somebody looking for a job or internship in the technology field please give them my email address and I can forward their information to HR here.

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Aili Monahan

Email: aili.monahan@westtown.edu

I'm currently a high school math teacher at Westtown School in Westtown, PA. I am teaching Geometry and Algebra II. Westtown School is a private, Quaker boarding school with about 400 students in the Upper School. I am also a dorm parent and Varsity soccer coach for the girls program. I live on campus (in fact, on a girls hall) and my housing is provided to me for free, as well as food in the dining room. My long term plans include staying here for another year and then possibly applying to Law School or pursuing a masters in Social Work. I am interested in working in an area related to child advocacy.

If current senior math majors are interested in teaching next year and looking for options, Westtown is in the market for new math teachers. Only an A.B. is necessary and they enjoy getting students from the Tri-Co. Please feel free to contact me if you would like to talk to me about teaching math in private schools.

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Jennifer Nissly


I am currently living in San Francisco, CA. I am an Associate with PricewaterhouseCoopers. In my work, I do not really use the information I learned in my classes but I use the thought process that I learned while at Bryn Mawr. I use the skill of breaking down a problem, looking at the individual parts, and then putting the pieces back together as a solution.

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Jasmine Nittiksimmons


I am working as a systems analyst for NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in Pasadena, CA. I work in the engineering group. Our primary job is to assess the health of the spacecrafts and the ground systems that support them. We do this by looking at how much data was lost or degraded in the process of either getting to a spacecraft or coming back from a spacecraft and through all the decoding processes. We also look at other statistical measures of performance including mean-time-between-failure. It is very exciting to be working at NASA (lots of rocket scientist jokes). It is always funny when I hear myself saying, "I work for NASA." The next few years here (2003-2004) will become even more exciting because there will be a multitude of spacecrafts making passes near earth all very close to one another which will require tracking more than one spacecraft at one time on a single antenna. This has not been required in the past. There is a lot of cool information on JPL projects at http://jpl.nasa.gov. There are also some beautiful pictures taken from the Hubble telescope.

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Class of 2001

Lisa Duffy


I am attending medical school right across town from Bryn Mawr at Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine. After Bryn Mawr I took a year off to work at home in New York while applying to medical schools. I started school this past fall and will be completing my first year in May. I absolutely love med school despite the enormous amounts of studying it requires.


While I did not go into a career directly related to Mathematics, my training at Bryn Mawr prepared me to be an analytic thinker. I think being a math major will help me as a diagnostician because as a math major you learn to be a good problem solver and thinker.

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Anna Hu

Email: alrchv@aol.com

I am currently working at Lockheed Martin in King of Prussia, where I have been for about 3 yrs. My title is "Systems Engineer", a title which can encompass a wide range of work. Basically, though, systems engineering involves work designing, developing, analyzing, and testing "systems", e.g. communications systems, spacecraft systems. My work at Lockheed has involved many aspects of systems engineering, including development of system requirements, putting together detailed design algorithms for systems, and designing and executing testing for the system.

More recently, I have moved to a group in Lockheed that focuses on doing Decision Analysis. The goal of Decision Analysis is to approach making decisions in a structured, systematic manner with the purpose of determining a "best-value" course of action that is based on what is most important to the decision maker. The purpose of our group is to perform decision analysis as it relates to all aspects of systems engineering.

There are times where I have really enjoyed my job, & times where I've hated it. Overall, though, I would say that I've mostly enjoyed it. Quite honestly, whether I am enjoying my job or not, I would have to say that it has very little to do w/ the actual work I am doing at the time. I find the type of work that I am engaged in to be interesting (which I think is an important basis for whether one will be able to enjoy a job or not). So it is really the non-technical aspects of the job - the people I end up working with, the office politics, etc (& I guess my opinion & attitude to those things!) - that determine whether or not I find my work experience to be enjoyable at any particular time.

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Meridith Unger

Email: munger@svbank.com

Since graduating in 2001, I've been working as a Credit Analyst at Silicon Valley Bank, a commercial lender, just outside of Boston. My math background had very little to do with being qualified for the job (in fact I wasn't qualified, having no accounting experience), but having a BA from a well-known liberal arts college seemed to do the trick. The job is primarily accounting, and the math that I use is mostly simple arithmetic, but financial analysis, while not as difficult as Real Analysis, is analysis nonetheless. I had the opportunity to hone those skills at Bryn Mawr. I've also found that a degree in Math demands a certain amount of respect from the business world. They seem to think we're rocket scientists, allowing math majors to pursue almost any career path. In addition to playing the mathematics card, I've also been able to really use my liberal arts education to my advantage. It has been agreed time and time again that an individual with a degree from a liberal arts college has a determination, perseverance and well-roundedness that is lacking in so many others. These are qualities far more impressive in the business world than what business, economics or accounting classes you might have taken in school.

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Wandy Chang


After I graduated from Bryn Mawr, I worked in an architecture office in NYC during the summer but my current career is actually of a high school mathematics teacher. I am teaching in Scotch Plains, NJ where I teach at the Union County Magnet High School for Math, Science, and Technology. It is a school specifically designed for prearchitecture and preengineering majors. I have 20 students and I teach Geometry, Precalculus, and Calculus III. I am also the Advisor for the Class of 2006 and am the SAT prep Instructor. Teaching keeps me pretty busy but I do intend to leave teaching (for now) and return to graduate school for a Master's in Architecture. Three of my students have applied to Bryn Mawr and I know that one of them has accepted entrance next fall!

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Theresa Kim

Email: tykim@u.washington.edu

Statement: I'm currently a graduate student in biostatistics at the University of Washington. If ever you thought of medical school but thought you'd miss math and/or wanted to do more research, look into this field. My RA is really interesting. I'm working with a group at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center that analyzes HIV/AIDS vaccines for a company in California. Other projects at my RA look at HIV/AIDS prevention in China and Africa. If you would like to mix cancer research, HIV/AIDS research, genetics research, or any element of public health/medicine with statistics, this is for you. Also, this might seem like it's going against studying math for a while, but since I was French minor, I went JYA. Keep in mind that French, English, Spanish, Mandarin Chinese, and Arabic are some of the most widely spoken languages on the planet. A degree in biostatistics with multilingual skills opens doors for you in international health also.

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Rachel Thomas

Email: thomasr@e-lcds.org

Since graduation, I have been working as a high school math teacher at Lancaster Country Day School, a small independent school in central PA. When I say small, I mean small - we have less than 500 students from kindergarten through 12th grade. My classes are generally about 10-12 students. I am currently teaching Geometry, Algebra II, Second-year Calculus, and an elective course called "Math for the Social Sciences," which examines voting systems, fair division, growth models, symmetry, and the math of art and architecture. I definitely use what I learned at BMC every single day. Not just the actual math I learned (which I do actually use - I even taught a seminar on Knot Theory last year!), but also the teaching skills I gleaned from interacting with talented educators every day. Bryn Mawr taught me a lot about math and a lot about life; even though I didn't realize it at first, I was completely prepared to enter the classroom, and I love what I do!

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Class of 2000

Kendra Burbank


In 2000-2001, I'll be working at the Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (National Institute for Nuclear Physics), in Pisa, Italy. I'll be working with a group that is currently building a silicon detector for the CDF project at Fermilab. In the Fall of 2001, I'll begin graduate studies in string theory at Harvard University.

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Jennifer Faerber


Next year, I will be working as a programmer/research assistant at Mathematica Inc., in Princeton, NJ. The company does social science policy research on issues such as health, nutrition, welfare and family etc. Programmers/Research assistants get set up with several researchers, all involved with individual projects, and perform statistical analyses on their projects, after going through a training phase. The job is more quantitative, but there is some exposure to the qualitative aspects of the research depending on how much the researcher wants to involve the programmer/research assistant.

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Jennifer Fisher

Email: jennifer.fisher@gs.com

I spent my first two years after graduating from Bryn Mawr in the fixed income division of Goldman Sachs. I was specifically in the finance area of the mortgage department where I spent my time building models in excel and access to help price asset back securities, commercial real estate and distressed asset portfolios. I spent my third year in the executive office, where I had a much more qualitative job, working with a team to determine which clients need executive office attention and then writing briefers for the top executives before their meetings. I was promoted to Associate after my third year have still been working in the executive office to help initiate a new Government Affairs effort.

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Susan Jo


I am teaching middle school math at Episcopal Academy. I teach 7th and 8th grades, so pre-algebra and algebra more specifically. I enjoy working with my students and have a great supportive faculty as well. I have fun teaching math. It has been more challenging this year than the past two because of a particular class, but I know this experience is stretching me and helping me become a better teacher :) Lately I have been thinking of going back to graduate school for a masters in mathematics education, but nothing is set yet.

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Elaina Khenina


I'll be working at The Segal Company in New York City as an actuary.

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Linday Moore


I graduated in 2000 with a double major in math and physics. I have been a graduate student in the physics department at Stanford University getting my PhD in condensed matter physics since summer 2000. My research is about special properties of electrons in quantum dots. I design and make microchips so that I can control the behavior of small numbers of electrons that are confined to 2 dimensions. Some of the work that we do in my group may someday be used for quantum computers because we are able to control the spin and other quantum properties of the electrons in our devices. My math major has been extremely useful to me, partly because math is such an integral part of physics, and also because it allows me to broaden my PhD studies. For example, I can TA classed in the math and physics departments here at Stanford, as well as taking graduate courses in both fields. I also had an edge in my graduate physics classes because a number of my classmates had to learn about group theory, non-linear dynamics and complex analysis for the first time when they got here, whereas I had already taken a course on each of those topics. In case you were wondering, (as I did) BMC prepared me very well for graduate school. I have found the work load at Stanford to be comparable to the work that I was doing my junior and senior years at Bryn Mawr with a double major.

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Michiru Nasu


My future employer is Bloomberg L. P. in Princeton NJ. I will be working as a a Research Assistant in the Quality Assurance Group. Joining in this Group will be exciting! The Group was just established last September, so it is very young and new, and I will have tons of opportunities to contribute to their fundamental development!

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Kimberly Rhodes


I will be working at the Mathworks in Natick, MA. My title is Technical support engineer.

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Yuka Tamura


I will be working in San Francisco (Paolo Alto), California. I will be an investment banking analyst in the technology group of Saloman Smith Barney, mainly doing IPOs for Tech companies.

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Class of 1999

Jocelyn Arcari

Email: j_arcari@hotmail.com

I am currently pursuing my MBA at Cornell University. I would like to start a career in operations management in the pharmaceutical industry when I graduate in May 2004. I just finished my first semester at Cornell and found that my math degree made it much easier for me to handle several of the classes, including Statistics, Microeconomics and Finance. I would suggest that students try to take one of these courses during undergrad to get a flavor for more uses of mathematics in the business world. Before returning to school, I was working for Computer Sciences Corporation (CSC) in their consulting group in the NY metro area. While there, I worked with several companies in different industries (financial services, textiles, pharmaceuticals, health care). I also was able to use my math background to do computer programming on one of my projects. My work at CSC sparked my interest in the pharmaceutical industry and helped me determine that I would like to try my hand at working in supply chain or operations management. Consulting provides a great opportunity to work with different businesses and learn about different industries, and consulting firms usually have really good training programs. It was a great choice for me because I wasn't sure what I wanted to do when I was graduating from Bryn Mawr. I think the MBA will help me with my next career step. As an aside, you generally need 3+ years of experience before most schools will consider you apply for an MBA.

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Cecilia Diniz

Email: Cdiniz@fireant.ma.utexas.edu

Cecilia is a Ph.D. student in mathematics at the University of Texas at Austin.

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Cheryl Koester

Email: ckoester@fcs.pvt.k12.pa.us

I am the full time network administrator at Friends' Central School in Wynnewood, Pennsylvania. I administer a local area network that consists of 3 domains on two campuses, encompassing a total of 5 servers, 250 workstations, and 1000 users. I also do not get enough sleep.

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Jessica Ree


Email: jessica.ree@riskmetrics.com
www.riskmetrics.com

I am a research assistant for a small (non-public) company that makes risk management software for banks. My projects are many and varied. I have done a lot of testing of our product CreditManager to assure that the mathematics we present in the technical document has been correctly implemented. I have also done some programming and written some technical documents concerning CreditManager. I love my job! I'm so glad I went this route. (I had been very down on financial jobs in the past.)

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Class of 1998

Hilary Cooke

Email: hilary.cooke@ptsem.edu

I am currently in my first year at Princeton Theological Seminary. I am planning to do a four year joint program with Rutgers, graduating with a Master of Divinity and a Master of Social Work and eventually practice pastoral counseling. I am living proof that you can do anything with a degree in mathematics. You might not believe it but I do actually use my math here:)

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Jamie Fiore

Email: Jamie.fiore@gs.com

I am a second year Associate in the Equities Division of Goldman Sachs, in New York. I work in GSS, or Global Securities Services, where I work in a sales-trading role with Hedge Funds. I would love to hear from any Bryn Mawr students interested in pursuing a career on Wall Street.

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Heather Fleming

Email: Heather.Fleming@alumnae.brynmawr.edu

I'm working on my masters degree in electrical and computer engineering at the University of California, San Diego.

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Zhenjian He

Email: Zhenjian.He@alumnae.brynmawr.edu

Since graduation, I have been working for R&D IT of GlaxoSmithKline, a global healthcare company. I joined GlaxoSmithKline through its Analyst Development Program after I graduated from Bryn Mawr. During the program I worked on various pharmaceutical computer projects, which include new technology evaluations and implementations, object-oriented programming, client server and network engineering, and database systems development. Currently I specialize in data warehousing projects in support of R&D decision making. My area of specialization is not particularly mathematical, but the underlying theoretical foundation for data modeling is comprised of set theory, relational algebra and relational calculus. With my math background, it was not difficult for me to pick up the design and modeling techniques that are based on the mathematical theory.

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Corinne McNeely

I had a lot of trouble deciding what to do after college: grad school, teaching, work??? I applied for many jobs and internships after I graduated. In December, I got accepted to the Undergraduate Research Semester program at Sandia National Laboratory. I spent 9 months in sunny Livermore, CA working on Applied Mathematics research. As it turned out, I spent most of my time Java programming. After my internship, I decided I wanted to go back to school for computer science not mathematics. I was accepted into a masters program at Georgia Tech in the fall of 1999. I had to spend an extra year taking remedial undergraduate courses in computer science since I hadn't taken anything past the introductory course at Bryn Mawr. After that, I found a research assistantship performing research in Formal Specification Languages, a weird mix between computer science theory-and mathematics. I finished my master's project and graduated in May of 2002. Since June of 2002, I've been working for Harris Corporation, a government contractor in Melbourne, FL, as a software engineer. I'm currently working on a project for the FAA.

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Daniel Soltis

Email: DanielRSoltis@gmail.com

I'm currently in grad school at the Interactive Telecommunications Program at Tisch School of the Arts at NYU, studying some hard-to-define interdisciplinary mix of design, engineering, art, computer programming, and social theory. I find that, even when what I'm working with is not directly math-related, that background enhances my ability to understand and manipulate information and to create more sophisticated interactions. (Or so I like to think.)

Prior to that, I spent my first couple of years out of college floundering about, and then I worked for several years (and still work part-time) as a writer and statistician for a small medical instrumentation company, despite the fact that I assiduously avoided statistics classes while in undergrad.

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Jill Wong

Email: jill.wong@alumnae.brynmawr.edu

I am currently employed in the Dispute Analysis and Investigations division of PricewaterhouseCoopers. This type of business integrates consulting with litigation and provides a unique approach to everyday work. With each new engagement, I have had the opportunity to develop and work with different kinds of financial models but also broaden and deepen my knowledge in various industries and product lines.

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Class of 1997

Yoko Adachi

Email: yoyada@hotmail.com

Currently I am working as a programmer in the biostatistics department of a contract research organization(CRO) called Parexel (by the way, I had never heard of the name of the company nor what CROs are when I was in college.) People in my department are either "programmers," or "statisticians." Programmers are people who tabulates analyzed result of an experiment, and if you have a Bachelor's degree in math, computer science, or a related field, you can generally apply for this position. In order to be statisticians, on the other hand, a Master's degree or Ph.D in statistics is usually required. Statisticians formulate the analytical design of a usually required. Statisticians formulate the analytical design of a clinical trial. They typically calculate the sample size required in the study, and determine the method of analysis based on the type of the trial, such as whether you should use a parametric or non-parametric method.

You don't need to have any knowledge of biology or medicine. I think high school biology and common knowledge on health from newspapers would be sufficient. Furthermore, Parexel decided to hire me even though I did not have a computer science background. The program you need to know if you want a computer related job in the pharmaceutical industry is called SAS, but if you know any computer language, you can pick up SAS language pretty quickly. I used to think that pharmaceuticals and clinical experiments are all about medicine. It's not. There are a lot of career opportunities for people who studied math and/or computer science. You don't necessarily need to have a strong background in applied math in order to find a job either. When I was in college I took mainly pure math courses, hardly any applied math courses. All of you are much more marketable than you think. Actually I was hired in Japan. In a country that is suffering from a serious economic depression and the employment of new college graduate women is about 50%, I was able to find a career opportunity. This would not have been possible without my degree in math and an ability to speak both English and Japanese. Maybe Bryn Mawr is not the best known school in the country, but keep in mind that the degree in math does have quite an impact on many of the industries.

From January, I will be working in the Parexel office in Japan, completing the training in London. If anyone has a question, please feel free to email me at. The homepage of the company I work for iswww.parexel.com, and I believe they have an office in Philly as well.

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Kathleen Dooley


While at Bryn Mawr I not only earned my AB in Mathematics, I also earned my teaching credentials and was certified by the State of Pennsylvania to teach high school math. Before graduation, I was offered a job teaching in Costa Rica. I took it and spent the next three years there. In 2000 I left Cost Rica for Mexico City, lived there for two years, am now living in Shanghai, and plan living on in at least three more countries before moving home. I really enjoy what I do and love having a job that allows me to travel all over the world.

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Elizabeth Ferry

Email: elizabethferry@earthlink.net

I received my diploma in nursing in 1987. I then worked in intensive care units at various hospitals. I entered Bryn Mawr College in 1992. I graduated with a bachelor's in mathematics in 1997 (continuing to work in a surgical trauma unit at Hahnemann University). I entered Wake Forest University in 1997 and graduated in 1999 with a master's in mathematics.

I have been job searching since September. I am looking for a position in a pharmaceutical or biotech company. I am still working as a nurse too.

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Jessica Hope

Email: JSH11A@aol.com

I was a math major, as you know... officially a member of the class of '97. I finished my coursework a semester early in December of '96 because I wanted to get a running start in my career. As it turned out, launching a career was not as easy as I had anticipated! My original plan when I began my Bryn Mawr education was to teach. So, I was a part of Bryn Mawr's teacher certification program, and graduated with both a B.A. in Mathematics and the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania secondary teaching certification in mathematics.

Teaching jobs in the Philadelphia area were harder to come by than I had anticipated, even in the field of mathematics. The market was flooded! I was strongly rooted to this area, and did not want to move elsewhere. So, I worked for about 6 months at various non-exciting jobs such as temporary administrative work, substitute teaching, and tutoring math at a for-profit learning center. None of these positions was spectacular, but I was gaining valuable experience. My first real break came when I was hired by Harcum College --- in two different capacities. First, I was a math tutor in the AIM for Success program at Harcum. This program is a grant-funded program that provides educational support to under-prepared college students. Simultaneously, I worked as a math teacher for the Upward Bound program at Harcum. This program, also grant-funded, provides underprivileged high school students with the resources necessary to attend college and to succeed. I was able to take on additional responsibilities during my two-year tenure at Harcum, eventually earning the title of Learningeaching a science course, Fundamentals of Physical Science. During this time at Harcum College, my interest in the fields of finance and investing was growing. I left Harcum to accept a position in a small investment management firm. I worked in an administrative capacity, gaining knowledge about the field both on-the-job and through my own research and study.

After several months with this firm, I began the process of obtaining my securities and insurance licenses. I currently am a registered representative (a.k.a. stockbroker), and am also a licensed life and health insurance agent. I currently run my own financial planning practice through American Express Financial Advisors. I experience a high degree of job-satisfaction and am quite pleased with my career path to date and the place to which my Bryn Mawr degree has brought me.

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Benna Lehrer


OK, a description of what I've been up to. It's not very mathematically related, but there is a bit of a connection. After BMC I worked as a paralegal at an international law firm in Kazakhstan. After a year, I decided to go to law school (because I really wanted to make money)--I went to UCONN Law. During law school, however, I became really disenchanted with the amount of people in the law field that JUST care about earning money. I also started working in the public policy field--at the Connecticut Law Revision Commission, a legislative office that conducts study committees and research which culminates in revisions and new bills. I have decided that my career must focus on helping others--no matter what capacity. I have since graduated, and moved to Chicago. I am presently working for Women Employed, a non-profit that advocates for and researches women's issues to create more equity and encourages education, training, and better jobs for lower income women. I'm only here until March, so I'm looking for something that will bring me a little back to my roots-- Russia. I would like to get involved either diplomatically or within corporations to coordinate corporation efforts to NOT participate i

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Vidya Murthy


I am class of 1997. As you know, I majored in Math. I also minored in Economics.

My first job after Bryn Mawr was at a nonprofit -- I basically did market research, competitor analysis, and financial management for them. Then I moved to San Francisco and got a job at a small software company. I did a variety of things there, including QA, client consulting and installations, technical support and release planning. I left that job last year to go back to school to get my MBA. I am currently a first year MBA student at the Graduate School of Management at UC Davis. I am planning to concentrate in Finance and Strategic Management.

I don't think I directly used anything I learned in school in my jobs, but I think I excelled because of the thought processes I learned in school and the analytical skills I gained.

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Rachel E. Vincent

Rice University
Department of Computational & Applied Mathematics
Email: Rvincen@caam.rice.edu

I am responding to your letter concerning BMC Department of Mathematics alumnae. You may post my contact information the BMC Math website. I am currently a graduate student in the Department of Computational and Applied Mathematics at Rice University. I began my work here in September 1997.

The Department of Computational & Applied Mathematics of Rice University is highly rated among applied mathematics graduate programs. The professors are well known in there areas of expertise and are usually very approachable and helpful mentors and advisors. The department specialties include partial differential equations (in many flavors), numerical linear algebra, operations research, and optimization. You can visit the CAAM research web page to read more about what types of things the professors and are doing here at Rice http://www.caam.rice.edu/research_groups.html

This is a small department, so graduate classes are small and you have a easy access to professors. There are a good number of research options available here and opportunities to collaborate with professors in other departments.

I am a part of the Keck Computational Biology Predoctoral program. The work I am beginning will use a numerical linear algebra technique to assist in structure determination of proteins. I have an advisor in my department, Dr. Dan Sorensen, and an advisor in the Biochemistry Department, Dr. George Phillips. So there is also the possibility of expanding work beyond this department. This is expected given that this is an applied program.

My project focuses on the visualization of the complex trajectories that result from molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. We will develop Singular Value Decomposition (SVD) analysis of the computed trajectories to augment abilities to identify preferred molecular configurations and study periodic behavior.

The proposed work is to fully develop this approach into working software tool for MD simulation, analysis and visualization. The interactive graphical analysis tool we (my advisors and I) intend to develop is expected to allow a user to query the MD data base.

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Class of 1996

Jyotsna Advani

Email: Jyotsna.Advani@alumnae.brynmawr.edu

Greetings! I double-majored in Math & Computer Science at Bryn Mawr, with some overlap in courses between the two majors. I decided to immediately continue on with graduate school in Computer Science, at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. Two years later, after obtaining my M.S. in Computer Science, I moved to Boston to work in the Consulting division of a firm in the supply-chain industry, called i2 Technologies (www.i2.com). After exploring that career path, I realized I wanted to do something more in sync with my computer science background. I am now working at Akamai Technologies (www.akamai.com) in Cambridge, MA, in the IT department. My current role involves web development, more from the technical, back-end data perspective. Additionally, my interest lies in the non-profit sector, and in my spare time I work on a non-profit development organization that I have helped start recently, The LittleHut Foundation. So all in all, a wealth of opportunities lie ahead, depending on your interest! Please feel free to contact me with any questions (or just to chat) via email.

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Jennifer J. Blechar

Email: jennifjb@ifi.uio.no

I graduated BMC with a major in Mathematics, concentration in Computer Science and minor in Economics. As with many graduates, I was not quite certain what career I wanted to pursue upon graduation. Using the BMC Career Development office, I attended several information sessions and applied to jobs in a variety of industries. In the end, I decided to pursue a career in consulting and accepted an offer with Accenture (formerly known as Andersen Consulting).

I worked in the telecommunications industry within Accenture for six years and was primarily engaged in large scale systems implementations in major telecom firms. In 2002, I decided to continue my education and obtained an MSc in Analysis, Design and Management of Information Systems from the London School of Economics and Political Science (http://www.lse.ac.uk/). This was a fantastic program that combined both the skills I learned while at Bryn Mawr as well as the experience I gained while working as a consultant. I completed my MSc in 2003 and am currently a PhD student and research fellow in the Department of Informatics at the University of Oslo in Norway (http://www.uio.no/).

I would be happy to discuss any of the above with those interested!

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Karyn Folland

Email: kfolland@owc.com

When I was a senior (I actually did both Math and Physics), I was interested in the financial services industry, as well as consulting. Financial services sounded appealing to me (though I don't really know why), so I applied for many jobs in investment banking, accounting, equity research, etc. The nature of the work of a consultant, as well as the lifestyle, also sounded very appealing, so I applied to a number of consultancies as well. Oliver, Wyman seemed to be the perfect intersection of my two interests, as it is a strategy consulting company that specializes in the financial services industry.

I first heard of OWC because they participated in the 4 college consortium recruiting effort in New York (along with Haverford, Vassar, and Union). However, due to the disappointing turnout of resumes we've had in the last couple of years, HR has decided that it is not worth our time to continue participating in this effort. Therefore, if Mawrters or Fords are interested in Oliver, Wyman, they should submit their resumes either directly to me, or to our recruiter - Ronna Hermann. I would be happy to talk to anyone interested in pursuing consulting either at Oliver, Wyman or at other firms.

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Louisa (Winer) Tran

Email: louisa.tran@fcps.edu

I certainly did not follow a direct career path after graduating from Bryn Mawr! I now teach high school math and computer science, via an unpredictable route that started with a master's degree in math (from Northwestern), followed by a job in research for the advertising industry, temporary secretarial work, and running an after-school reading program for 1st-graders.

My math degrees have turned out to be quite valuable. While I learned quickly that I did not want to pursue a career in advertising, I feel that having "mathematics major" on my resume opened the door to that industry for me. When I decided to give teaching a try, it turned out that having a math major was better than having an education degree. It has been easy enough to make up the education classes, but colleagues who were education majors have to make up courses like Abstract Algebra!

I actually teach more computer science than math right now, but at the AP level there is a lot of overlap. There is so much to learn in both of these fields - for me, too, not just my students! I have gotten real satisfaction out of hearing some of my students declare, "I want to major in math [or CS] in college." I'm also thrilled that one of my best (and favorite) students is applying to Bryn Mawr!

I would love to talk to any math major who is considering (in even the most hypothetical way) teaching. If she lives in the DC metro area, she could shadow me to see what a typical day is like.

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Class of 1995
Rebecca Buchanan

I graduated from Bryn Mawr in 1995 with no clear idea about what to do with my math degree; I did not want to go to grad school in pure math and had no interest in finance or business. I thought education would be a good career, so got a M.S. in mathematics education from Syracuse University and taught in the math department at West Chester University (West Chester, PA) for two years. By that time I had decided that I really did not want to teach after all, and looked around for something else to do. I wanted to get back into doing math, not just teaching low level algebra and geometry. I also wanted to apply my quantitative skills to a good cause, so looked for a grad program that combined math with environmental issues/ecology. What I found was the interdisciplinary graduate program Quantitative Ecology and Resource Management (aka QERM) at the University of Washington (UW) in Seattle. I am now in my fourth year of a Ph.D. program in QERM, and I highly recommend it.

As far as I know, QERM is a unique program in that it offers opportunities to use both statistics and applied math to study ecological systems and resource management issues; other grad programs seem to focus on one method or the other. Although its name may indicate that a lot of science knowledge is required, QERM is really very quantitative, and math majors are usually better prepared for QERM than biology majors. That said, it helps to have taken a biology/ecology class or two at the college level since the only required courses in QERM are quantitative. The math skills required are calculus, probability and statistics, differential equations, linear algebra, and some computer programming. However, as long as your basic linear algebra and calculus skills are good (at the level of Calc II) and you are a strong analytical thinker, you should do fine in QERM. QERM offers both a master's and a doctorate. Both are research-based, and how long they take depends the student. Most students are funded via research assistantships; some get teaching assistantships. Student research areas vary, but include novel methods of estimating salmon run sizes and population sizes of salmon, whales, and elk; studying population dynamics of sharks; developing and analyzing new environmental sampling methods; analyzing precipitation data; modeling shoot growth in Douglas fir; and estimating tree crown density as part of estimating fuel supplies for forest fires. I am developing mark-recapture models for adult salmon migrating up the Columbia and Snake rivers past the hydroelectric dams. My models use two types of tags (radio tags and PIT tags) and focus on survival but include other processes as well.

There is a high demand in natural resource management fields for QERM graduates or anybody with strong quantitative skills. At UW, "natural resource management" typically means fisheries or forestry, but every natural resource has to be managed, so graduates may work in other fields. Many graduates go on to work for a regulatory agency such as NOAA, EPA, or a state Fish and Wildlife Department; some do environmental consulting, and some teach at the university level. Every graduate who has looked for a job in this field has found one. I highly recommend this field (and graduate program) for math students who want to develop both their analytical skills and quantitative tools to study natural systems and/or resource management issues. For more information about QERM, visit their website at http://depts.washington.edu/qerm/; I would be happy to discuss QERM with any student who is interested. UW also has a strong program in biostatistics for students interested in combining statistics with human health; their website is at http://www.biostat.washington.edu/.

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Laura McKinney Novak

Email: Laura.mckinney@yale.edu

I am currently in my fifth year of the doctoral program in Statistics at Yale University. My dissertation, which I'm hoping to finish within the year, has to do with modeling NYSE stock returns.

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Class of 1994

Deborah Cousins


I am currently working for CODA Research Inc. http://www.codares.com, Inc. in Durham, NC. The NC company provides research support for the epidemiology branch of the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences. My title is "Senior Study Supervisor", but I am also a "Programmer/Analyst". It depends what the client needs since I am trained in both epidemiology and SAS programming (a great match). I have mainly been working on a Uterine Fibroids Study. Since I am also an analyst, I use mathematics (statistics really) almost everyday. Of course programming requires logic, which is something that I learned in my mathematics courses at Bryn Mawr. Haven't had use for Abstract Algebra or Number Theory yet, but if it is possible I am sure I will find a way to use it. You never know!

Since graduation in 1994: I received a MSPH from the Department of Epidemiology at UNC Chapel Hill, NC in 1997. I am technically still enrolled in the Ph.D. program. I completed my coursework for the Ph.D. in 1998 and took a leave of absence. (It has been hard to go back -- Since taking leave of absence,as I have acquired a house and family.) I also worked as an Associate Epidemiologist for Family Health International during 1998 and 1999. At that time, I developed questionnaires and studies related to infectious disease and female reproductive health.

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A. Heather Coyne

Email: ahcoyne@erols.com

I ultimately graduated with only a math minor--my major was political science. After a year interning in DC with a public policy think tank, I went to grad school at Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies. The math for an international relations degree is pretty minimal, although we used some in our economics classes. I am currently working for the White House Office of Management and Budget in the National Security Division, and pretty much the most advanced math I do is addition! However, many of my colleagues delve more deeply into the quantitative aspects of their programs, so I guess it's possible that a math major could flourish here.

OMB jobs require a graduate degree. As I'm sure many BMC students are finding, a graduate degree is becoming a pre-req for more and more jobs. And once students get into a graduate program, I do have a tip for them. I got my job through the Presidential Management Internship program, which takes graduate students who have a commitment to public service and places them in a two year position with the Federal Government. During those two years, they complete rotations in their agencies and throughout government and get career development training. After the two year term, they convert to permanent positions in the government. It is a great program if you are interested in government. Originally, the program was geared to public policy students, but it has now reached out to graduates of engineering, physics, and other science programs as well, and places people at NSF, NIST, NASA, NOAA, and a variety of other agencies that might be of interest to a math major.

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Elisabeth (Lisa) Mennella Pyle

Email: elisabethpyle@comcast.net

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